Ocean Township Sensory Motor Integration

Sensory Motor Integration Ocean Township.jpg

Empowered Learning Transformation Centers

Sensory Processing Disorder Treatment & Resources

What Is Sensory Processing Disorder?

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is a complex disorder of the brain that affects developing children. Children with sensory processing difficulties often suffer from impaired self-esteem, anxiety, depression or aggression, that affect social participation.

Children with Sensory Processing Disorder misinterpret everyday sensory information, such as touch, sound, and movement. They may feel bombarded by information, they may seek out intense sensory experiences, or they may have other symptoms.  Read: Why the Name "Sensory Processing Disorder"?

 

Why Do So Many Children Have A SPD Diagnosis?

Like with autism, there is an epidemic rise in number of children with Sensory Processing Disorder now being diagnosed.  Many children diagnosed with SPD developed SPD symptoms from heavy metals delivered through vaccinations and environmental toxins that result in serious brain, gut and immune system disorders.

 

There is Hope and Recovery For SPD!

Many parents worldwide have recovered their children with SPD!  Recovery children from SPD is achievable using variety of occupational therapy, medical interventions, auditory integration therapy, homeopathy and other alternative therapies that support recovery.

 

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is a complex disorder of the brain that affects developing children and adults. People with SPD misinterpret everyday sensory information, such as touch, sound, and movement. They may feel bombarded by information, they may seek out intense sensory experiences, or they may have other symptoms.

 

Sensory processing" refers to our ability to take in information through our senses (touch, movement, smell, taste, vision, and hearing), organize and interpret that information, and make a meaningful response. For most people, this process is automatic. When we hear someone talking to us or a bird chirping, our brains interpret that as speech or an animal sound, and we respond to that information appropriately.

 

Children who have a Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), however, don’t experience this process in the same way. SPD affects the way their brains interpret the information they take in and also how they act on that information with emotional, attentional, motor, and other responses.

 

What Does SPD Look Like?

There are several types of Sensory Processing Disorder; each one may result in a number of different behavioral and sensory patterns. Some of the most common behavior patterns are described below.

 

Sensory-Avoiding Children

Some children with SPD are over-responsive to sensation. Their nervous systems feel sensation too easily or too intensely and they feel as if they are being constantly bombarded with information.

 

Consequently, these children often have a "fight or flight" response to sensation, a condition called "sensory defensiveness." They may try to avoid or minimize sensations, such as by avoiding being touched or being very particular about clothing.

 

These children may:

Respond to being touched with aggression or withdrawal

Fear movement and heights, or get sick from exposure to movement or heights

Be very cautious and unwilling to take risks or try new things

Feel uncomfortable in loud or busy environments, such as sports events, malls

Be very picky eaters and/or overly sensitive to food smells

These children may be diagnosed with Sensory Over-Responsivity.

 

Contact us today!


Contact Our Sensory Motor Integration near Ocean Township NJ

Name *
Name
Phone *
Phone