Summer is the Ideal Time to Assess Weaknesses and Build Confidence for Students

Report cards can show symptoms and areas a child is struggling with, but does not indicate a child's full potential or what is holding them back. How can we make the most of our time during summer?

Missing Link for Parents and Kids Is Proper Assessment; Year-End Report Cards Reflect Symptoms, Not Potential

STAMFORD, CT (June 23, 2015)  With schools around the country beginning their summer break, parents and students will be reviewing report cards to note accomplishments, areas for improvement and red flags.

“Students can utilize the summer months to improve how their brain functions, building learning skills and self-confidence for the coming school year,” explained Peter Riddle, a learning specialist of 37 years and co-founder of Empowered Learning Transformation Centers (ELTC). “Our assessment and programs identify underlying and unrecognized learning challenges. We then correct those deficiencies to help students reach peak performance levels. When they return to school in the fall, ELTC students have an easier time comprehending materials, absorbing classroom lessons and completing homework with less stress and more confidence. They will be on their way to becoming independent learners for the rest of their lives.”

Starting in 1993 at the Stamford, Connecticut center, ELTC expanded into Hazlet, New Jersey in 2006, and Bethesda, Maryland in April 2015. Serving the greater New York City, Philadelphia and Washington D.C. metro areas, ELTC had had a 90% success rate and has helped more than 5,000 people improve their ability to learn, and greatly improve their lives. They have also transitioned more than 750 kids off of ADHD medication.

“Our breakthrough fusion of educational and medical technology enables people to address issues at the core level and enable the brain to rewire itself to function at a much higher level,” continued Mr. Riddle. “From students struggling with school, to overworked professionals, to athletes–our programs tackle problems with attention, focus, learning and behavior for people of all ages and abilities.”

Most students experience learning losses over the summer as they are rarely engaged with educational activities. Every fall, this results in lost instruction time because of the need to reteach several skills and/or topics. ELTC’s programs, available year-round, are complementary to classroom instruction and keep students engaged.

ELTC will host a six-week Summer Boot Camp to strengthen weak areas. The Boot Camp will run from June 22 through August and will include two-hour daily programs, four days per week. The six-week program can be adjusted to accommodate summer travel.

Ricardo Gonzalez